Unifi cell size tuning

There is a moment of perfect stillness after the cable slips through my fingers and vanishes back up the hole in the ceiling like an angry snake.

Then the opening stanza of a rich poem of invective leaps from my lips and my wife stares up at me from below, eyes wide, frozen just as I am, ready to catch me if I rage too hard and lose my balance. The words die on my lips and I drop my burning arms to my side.

Tiny drops of blood ooze from shredded cuticles. Maybe I should throw away everything I own and live in the mountains and grow my own food and never think about technology ever again.

As I explained in our October reviewthe Ubiquiti access points delivered on both points. Or screwing around with your Wi-Fi. Or, alternately, you can get paid to do it at your job. I will admit that configuration mistakes were made—heaps of them, in fact, though I believe that most have at this point been rectified. The upside, though, is that I learned a lot by screwing up so much, and the only person I hurt was myself. Well, and my wife, whenever my weekend tinkering sessions resulted in no Wi-Fi for a few hours.

This piece is intended to let you laugh at my mistakes as much as anything else. Ubiquiti makes all manner of stuff, ranging from wired gear to full-on heavy-duty WISP equipment.

EdgeMAX gear is intended to be standalone, used for enterprise-grade switching and routing without the software-defined networking special sauce exclusive to the Unifi line. However, from a product perspective the Unifi line has evolved considerably sinceadding several newer high-end SKUs and refining its lineup to reduce or eliminate some odd quirks.

There are plenty of Unifi alternatives—most notably Latvian-based MikroTikwhich gets props for its low up-front cost and deep configurability.

You must login or create an account to comment. This is what it sounds like when fans cry. He also knows stuff about enterprise storage, security, and human space flight. Lee is based in Houston, TX. Email lee. Channel Ars Technica.In most Wi-Fi systems you can disable the slowest transfer rates.

This is typically done to improve efficiency since the transfers at slower rates eat up limited air time. This can backfire however with unexpected results. In The access points broadcast this information in every beacon. To associate with the network every device has to support all basic rates i. Supported rates are optional. Supported rates that are common to both the device and the AP may be used.

Typically there are one or a couple of basic rates and they are at the slow end of the scale. In most systems the administrator can configure the the rates by disabling unwanted ones. Devices and APs will always use the highest rate the connection can carry.

The rate is adjusted for each frame if the connection quality changes, for example the device moves. It appears obvious that by disabling the lowest supported rates you can increase the throughput of the network. Slow transfers eat up a lot of the air time. It also appears that roaming would improve since by disabling slow i.

unifi cell size tuning

This will result in transmission errors and retries, which will eat up the freed air time. The user at the end of the bad connection will experience high latencies and especially jitter i. If you think you have a dense network with APs close by you need to think of the edges, too. At the fringes the coverage will inevitably grow thinner.

In the best case the fringe will be outside of the building where there are no users in the upper floors at least. On ground level it is difficult to prevent devices from associating as soon as the network is detected.

Most devices only track RSSI. Only if the connection is completely lost will the device start looking for a new AP. This will appear as a connection problem to the user.

The retries will continue. In most networks there is only a single required basic rate like 1 or 6 Mbps. The idea is that the less requirements there are the more clients can connect.Up until last year, things were simple - one AP per floor as I wasn't in device hell with piles of Chromebooks and IPads.

One AP in the middle of each floor would do things just fine. But I'm just envisioning the point in time where I've got 60 devices trying to run through one AP and the world just blows up. The single SSID is great for K-6 and teachers who are using their own devices throughout the building - Would prefer to keep it that way. Sooo - do I put two APs on each floor fairly close to the ends and turn the power down some - or is there a better way? Coverage is not an issue - I have a single AP on each floor now and no dead spots.

Right now, not a huge problem - but if one day the teachers on a single floor decide to run 25 Chromebooks and 30 IPads at the same time - it's not going to end well. Maybe the answer is two APs per floor, running 1 and 11, and locking different sets of client devices to one channel or the other?

It also helps to use dual band AP's but you also have to take into account the datasheet and the number of clients an AP is rated for. Dang, that was easy. This software is not made by linksys, it is actually an embedded version of linux. But you don't need to know linux to make it work. Linksys also sells a wireless range expander.

This is typical behavior as you move between APs. If you are using windows to manage your wireless connection it will poll for stronger signals, if I finds a stronger signal on the same SSID it will transition over to the stronger signal.

This second drop is due to the connection switching and reauthentication happening to the new AP. This is normal if you don't have a wireless access controller WAC or wireless lan controller WLC in place to manage your connections and authentication. The other way around getting dropped as you move between access points is to use a mesh style access points which work like the cell phone mesh network like Meraki nuts I see they are now part of ciscoRuckusOpenMeshor Ubiquiti.

IT Professionals of Florida, Inc. As long as they're on different channels you should have seamless hand-off between AP's. You have access to I think 11 channels and Auto from the Unifi controller. They mesh pretty well without much input from you. The only reason I'd consider turning the power down was if you were getting signal too far from campus. Single ssid is no problem. Two ap per floor is no problem.

unifi cell size tuning

If you make sure the ubnt controller and access points are running the latest firmware then the APs will adjust the power for you. Yes, there are 11 channels available but no, you shouldn't use anything except 1, 6, or I have done many installs of a floor with classrooms next to each other and across the hall.

One ap per classroom and one in the hall and no issues. The newest ubnt controller can do to scans for you so you can see your interference. I would try to keep it at Most newer access points have two radios inside.

One for 2. I wouldn't stack them directly on top of each other in a multi-level building. If you stagger them, you'll get more even coverage and less competition between APs depends on building construction, though, too.

If your AP is running both radios, 2. I would suggest at least adding a second AP. Check out the picture below.If you are reading this message, Please click this link to reload this page. Do not use your browser's "Refresh" button. Please email us if you're running the latest version of your browser and you still see this message.

Ships from United States. Most customers receive within days. Sold and Shipped by Technology Galaxy a-seller. With flexible mounting options, the Flex HD can be deployed on tabletops, walls, poles, and ceilings. Use the UniFi Controller software to quickly configure and administer an enterprise Wi-Fi network - no special training required. RF map and performance features, real-time status, automatic UAP device detection, and advanced security options are all seamlessly integrated.

Features Save Money and Save Time UniFi comes bundled with a nondedicated software controller that can be deployed on an on-site PC, Mac, or Linux machine; in a private cloud; or using a public cloud service. You also have the option of deploying the compact UniFi Cloud Key with built-in software. Expandable Unlimited scalability: build wireless networks as big or small as needed.

Start with one or upgrade to a three-pack and expand to hundreds while maintaining a single unified management system. Important network details are logically organized for a simplified, yet powerful, interface. Network Overview From a single pane of glass, view network topology and configuration, real-time statistics, and debugging metrics. Monitor your network's vitals and make on-the-fly adjustments as needed. Deep Packet Inspection Ubiquiti's proprietary Deep Packet Inspection DPI engine includes the latest application identification signatures to track which applications and IP addresses are using the most bandwidth.

Detailed Analytics The UniFi Network Controller provides configurable reporting and analytics to manage large user populations and expedite troubleshooting.

Advanced search and sorting capabilities make network management more efficient. Multi-Site Management A single controller running in the cloud can manage multiple sites: multiple, distributed deployments and multi-tenancy for managed service providers. Each site is logically separated and has its own configuration, maps, statistics, guest portal, and administrator accounts.

RF Environment Detect and troubleshoot nearby interference, analyze radio frequencies, and choose optimal AP placement. The auto-optimize feature configures the UDM with best practice settings, and the included radio AI capability optimizes channel selection using a genetic algorithm.

Advanced RF Performance RF performance and configuration features include spectral analysis, airtime fairness, band steering, and cell-size tuning.

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Back To Combo. The actual Open Box product may differ in packaging and included accessories, but has been tested to ensure basic functionality. Be the first to review this product See more " unifi ". Back To Top. Warranty, Returns, And Additional Information. Through the Newegg EggXpert Review Program, Newegg invites its best reviewers, known as EggXperts, to post opinions about new and pre-release products to help their fellow customers make informed buying decisions.

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UniFi Switch en WiFi update 4.0.10

Best Sellers.Do you just want better Wi-Fi in every room? Consider buying a Plume or Google Wifi or other similar plug-n-go mesh system. On the other hand, are you a technically proficient network kind of person who wants to build an enterprise-lite configuration at home? Do you dream of VLANs and port profiles and lovingly tweaked firewall rules?

Does the idea of crawling around in your attic to ceiling-mount some access points sound like a fun way to kill a weekend? Is your office just too quiet for your liking? Buy some Ubiquiti Unifi gear and enter network nerd nirvana. There is a moment of perfect stillness after the cable slips through my fingers and vanishes back up the hole in the ceiling like an angry snake.

Then the opening stanza of a rich poem of invective leaps from my lips and my mom stares up at me from below, eyes wide, frozen just as I am, ready to catch me if I rage too hard and lose my balance.

unifi cell size tuning

The words die on my lips and I drop my burning arms to my side. Tiny drops of blood ooze from shredded cuticles. Maybe I should throw away everything I own and live in the mountains and grow my own food and never think about technology ever again. The Ubiquiti access points delivered on both points.

Or screwing around with your Wi-Fi. Or, alternately, you can get paid to do it at your job. The upside, though, is that I learned a lot by screwing up so much, and the only person I hurt was myself. Well, and the family, whenever my weekend tinkering sessions resulted in no Wi-Fi for a few hours. This piece is intended to let you laugh at my mistakes as much as anything else. Ubiquiti makes all manner of stuff, ranging from wired gear to full-on heavy-duty WISP equipment.

EdgeMAX is meant to be standalone, used for enterprise switching and routing, without the software defined special sause exclusive to the Unifi line. Being a sort-of-nearly-sysadminand although at the time I've never been in charge of administering the guts of a large network, I picked up the ins and outs of enterprise network administration through countless collaborations and hallway conversations over the years.

No, I wanted to emulate the things I used to have at work. I wanted multiple segments and VLANs.Save Digg Del. Chapters 1 through 6 covered wireless communication with a focus on a single access point AP exchanging data with one or more clients. A single AP may be sufficient for home or small office use, but most wireless LANs involve a greater geographic area and require more APs.

This chapter explains how wireless coverage can be adjusted to meet a need and how it can be grown to scale over a greater area and a greater number of clients. As you work through this chapter, remember that two things are important: the size of the BSA or AP cell and the location of cells in relation to each other.

If you are in doubt about your answers to these questions or your own assessment of your knowledge of the topics, read the entire chapter. The goal of self-assessment is to gauge your mastery of the topics in this chapter.

If you do not know the answer to a question or are only partially sure of the answer, you should mark that question as wrong for purposes of the self-assessment. Giving yourself credit for an answer you correctly guess skews your self-assessment results and might provide you with a false sense of security. Choose all that apply.

An AP has been configured to use channel 1 with a transmit power of 20 dBm. With the AP located in the center of the lobby, you have determined that its signal will reach all locations in the lobby area.

However, some users with small battery-operated devices report connectivity problems when they move toward the outer walls of the lobby. Which one of the following approaches will probably fix the problem? Suppose that an AP is configured to offer the following data rates: 2- 5. Each AP has been configured with a transmit power level of 14 dBm. In addition, each AP has been configured to use a non-overlapping channel that is different from its adjacent neighbors.

All APs have been configured to offer only the,and Mbps data rates; all other rates are disabled. One day, one of the APs fails and someone replaces it. Afterward, users begin to call and complain about poor performance and roaming.Up until last year, things were simple - one AP per floor as I wasn't in device hell with piles of Chromebooks and IPads. One AP in the middle of each floor would do things just fine. But I'm just envisioning the point in time where I've got 60 devices trying to run through one AP and the world just blows up.

The single SSID is great for K-6 and teachers who are using their own devices throughout the building - Would prefer to keep it that way. Sooo - do I put two APs on each floor fairly close to the ends and turn the power down some - or is there a better way?

CCNA Wireless 640-722 Cert Guide: Planning Coverage with Wireless APs

Coverage is not an issue - I have a single AP on each floor now and no dead spots. Right now, not a huge problem - but if one day the teachers on a single floor decide to run 25 Chromebooks and 30 IPads at the same time - it's not going to end well. Maybe the answer is two APs per floor, running 1 and 11, and locking different sets of client devices to one channel or the other?

It also helps to use dual band AP's but you also have to take into account the datasheet and the number of clients an AP is rated for. Dang, that was easy.

What I’ve learned from nearly three years of enterprise Wi-Fi at home

This software is not made by linksys, it is actually an embedded version of linux. But you don't need to know linux to make it work. Linksys also sells a wireless range expander.

This is typical behavior as you move between APs. If you are using windows to manage your wireless connection it will poll for stronger signals, if I finds a stronger signal on the same SSID it will transition over to the stronger signal. This second drop is due to the connection switching and reauthentication happening to the new AP. This is normal if you don't have a wireless access controller WAC or wireless lan controller WLC in place to manage your connections and authentication.

The other way around getting dropped as you move between access points is to use a mesh style access points which work like the cell phone mesh network like Meraki nuts I see they are now part of ciscoRuckusOpenMeshor Ubiquiti.

IT Professionals of Florida, Inc. As long as they're on different channels you should have seamless hand-off between AP's. You have access to I think 11 channels and Auto from the Unifi controller. They mesh pretty well without much input from you. The only reason I'd consider turning the power down was if you were getting signal too far from campus.

Single ssid is no problem. Two ap per floor is no problem. If you make sure the ubnt controller and access points are running the latest firmware then the APs will adjust the power for you.

Yes, there are 11 channels available but no, you shouldn't use anything except 1, 6, or